Miscellany. 10.12.11.


CCTV/Creative Control, an intervention by Marcos Zotes in Brooklyn. (Image courtesy of Zotes.)

Congrats to James, Michael, Rosa, Daniel and Antonio for winning the five copies of Graffiti 365 — for the latest C-Mon Giveaway Extravaganza.

  • American executives: Paid to fail. This is pretty gross.
  • Progress: human civilization’s big mistake. (@jmcolberg.)
  • Steven Pinker thinks that humans are less violent than ever.
  • Sherman Alexie on the Lost Colony of Roanoke.
  • A taxonomy of taxonomies: A Historical Timeline of Systemic Data and the Development of Computable Knowledge. Or, how humans have created ways of sharing information. A good one for the information geeks. Find the explanatory blog post here.
  • A guide to character archetypes in women’s romantic comedies. My favorite: “The Woman Who Works in an Art Gallery.”
  • Procrastinate by reading this essay about how procrastination is tied to our relationship with time. Interesting fact: “Victor Hugo would write naked and tell his valet to hide his clothes so that he’d be unable to go outside when he was supposed to be writing.”
  • Flashback: Hunter S. Thompson’s 1965 Hell’s Angels story for The Nation.
  • John Perrault breaks down all the shows about Fluxus that seem to be popping up in institutions all around the Northeast.
  • Beautiful story: Love in the time of Stonewall, one of the models behind George Segal’s iconic West Village sculpture writes about how she met the love of her life.
  • Michael Kimmelman’s debut outing as New York Times architecture critic. It’s nice to see public housing get ink, but I would have loved a little context on how these structures fit into the  immediate landscape and how they might compare with other public housing efforts, past and present.
  • I’m totally late on this, but this Studio 360 piece about the TV show Dallas is all kinds of excellent. Thing I never knew: The show was HUGE in Romania.
  • Relentless Self-Promotion: In which I interview Work of Art judge/New York magazine critic Jerry Saltz about art reality, his fantasy green room demands and what it’s like to party with the Housewives. Bonus: Audio of Jerry imitating Simon de Pury.

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