Category: Architecture

Find me over at ARCHITECT.

Hannover Expo, 2000, in Hannover, Germany. Shigeru Ban with Frei Otto
Shigeru Ban’s design for the Japan Pavilion at Hannover Expo in 2000. Executed in collaboration with Frei Otto. (Image courtesy of Shigeru Ban. Photo by Hiroyuki Hirai.)

It seems like I’ve been on a bit of a Shigeru Ban tear in ARCHITECT. Last week I wrote up his design for the new Aspen Art Museum. This week, I was on to his Pritzker win. And the following day I participated in a round table with architecture critics Christopher Hawthorne, Mark Lamster and Alexandra Lange to talk about what it all means — for Ban and the Pritzker.

Check ‘em out. I am so ready to start building stuff with toilet paper tubes now…

Calendar 01.29.14.

National Life Insurance Company Building. Project, 1924–25, by Frank Lloyd Wright. The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives
National Life Insurance Company Building, project, 1924–25, by Frank Lloyd Wright. Part of the exhibit Frank Lloyd Wright and the City: Density vs. Dispersal, at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, opening Saturday. (Image courtesy of MoMA and The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives.)

The L.A. of the near-future and serial killer books.

Joaquin Phoenix in
Joaquin Phoenix in “Her.” Director Spike Jonze’s meeting with architects Diller Scofidio helped inspire the feel of the movie.

For my latest in ARCHITECT, I talk to Elizabeth Diller about future L.A., deconstructed operas and serial killers. Find the Q&A here.

Concrete Paradise: The history of Miami’s Marine Stadium.

Hilario Candela at the Miami Marine Stadium, 1963

It’s not everyday you get to write an architecture story that brings together Mies Van Der Rohe and Jimmy Buffett. Thankfully, god gave us the Miami Marine Stadium, one of Florida’s modernist masterpieces, designed by Cuban-born architect Hilario Candela in 1963. (That’s him above, posing before the stadium as it was under construction.)

This is a place with a fascinating history (one that is now chronicled at the Coral Gables Museum). Get the full scoop in ARCHITECT Magazine.

Calendar. 10.02.13.

The Micheels House, designed by Paul Rudolph, Westport, Connecticut, 1972-2007, by Chris Mottalini The Micheels House, designed by Paul Rudolph, Westport, Connecticut, 1972-2007, by Chris Mottalini. Part of an exhibition and book signing for Mottalini’s project After You Left/They Took It Apart (Demolished Paul Rudolph Homes), at The Landing at Reform, in Hollywood. Opens Thursday at 7pm. (Image courtesy of the artist.)

A different way of thinking about L.A.’s sprawl.

Andres Jaque at REDCAT in Los Angeles (Photo by C-Monster)

L.A. may be derided for its sprawl, but Spanish architect Andrés Jaque says the city’s in-between spaces make for a unique brand of urbanism — not to mention, some highly creative informal architecture. He has created installations inspired by these spaces in his new show at REDCAT in downtown. You can read all about it in my story in ARCHITECT.