Tagged: bruce conner

What I’m Reading: PRISM Index.


Get This Now: PRISM Index, Issue #1.

I have been seriously remiss for not writing about this sooner: PRISM Index, a lovingly crafted, hand-made art and culture magazine straight outta Columbus, Oh. Not only does it feature an original silkscreen cover by artist and founder Jeffrey Bowers, it comes bursting with goodies: drawings, stories, photography, excerpts of graphic novels and a funny, stand-alone mini-comic called Horror of the Hodag! Oh, and did I mention the multimedia components? A CD and DVD chock full of music and video compilations — the latter of which contains Jay Rosenblatt‘s must-see I Just Wanted to Be Somebody. I’m still going through all of the pieces (this is the sort of publication you chew on in bits), but if I had to pick one reason to pick up this wonderful magazine, it’s for Trent Harris’s moving essay on his friendship with artist Bruce Conner. It left me gasping.

Find the first issue via the magazine’s website, along with a short list of bookstores and galleries that also carry it. It is worth every penny of its $22 cover price.

Art for Stoners: L.A. museums edition.


Visual Molasses: A figure comes into focus very, very sloooowly in a Kevin Hanley video piece at MoCA. Hang around long enough and you’ll wonder if you’re seeing things. (Photos by C-M.)

Just because one L.A. museum is in the middle of a financial freefall doesn’t mean that there isn’t buzz-inducing art to be seen. At MoCA, in a corner of the Conceptualism in California show at the Geffen Contemporary there is a meltingly slow piece by Kevin Hanley, as well as a black-and-white, super-fast Bruce Conner number that has a total 2 a.m. music video kind of feel. Better yet: it’s comprised of three monitors. I coulda hung out there all afternoon.

Across town, at LACMA, there’s Chris Burden’s Urban Light installation. I know that this piece is far from new (it debuted in February), but I managed to spend a bit of time hanging out with this sculpture at dusk today and it was damn beautiful. The best part: anybody can wander around this thing, 24 hours a day. Perfect for a late-night hangout, especially if you’ve got a Slurpee in hand.


Eve Ray Forever, 1965-2006 by Bruce Conner. Quick cuts. Lots of nudity. Yeah.


Chris Burden’s Urban Light. Lampposts all in rows. Duuuude.

Late addition:

How could I forget? Marcel Duchamp’s Roto Relief: Optical Discs, at the Norton Simon. You are getting sleepy… On view through Dec. 8.